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How to Play Pai-Gow Poker
Poker Hand Rankings
Poker Hand Rankings List
5 of a Kind
5 of a Kind
           As we go through this list, you’ll probably notice a few differences between Pai-Gow Poker and normal Poker rankings. The first being the 5 of a Kind, because you’d never see that at a normal poker table. Since Pai-Gow Poker uses a Joker Card, there is a small chance that the player will get four Aces and a Joker. And that is the first hand ranking we’ll add to our list.

           This is the list of which hands beat what. 5 of a Kind is at the top, which means that it will beat all of these other hands.
Royal Flush
Royal Flush
           Next on the list, is the Royal Flush. A lot of people will recognize this because it is the highest ranking hand in Poker. A Royal Flush is an Ace, King, Queen, Jack and Ten, all of the same suit.

           The only hand that can beat a Royal Flush is the 5 of a Kind; otherwise the Royal Flush beats all other rankings.
Straight Flush
Straight Flush
           A Royal Flush is considered the highest ranking Straight Flush and that’s the next ranking on our list. A Straight Flush will lose against a Royal Flush and higher but will win against a Four of a Kind or lower. A Straight Flush is when all five cards are in sequence and also have the same suit. For example, a 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of hearts.
4 of a Kind
4 of a Kind
           A Four of a Kind is next on the list and this ranking consists of four cards of equal value. For example, a 9 of hearts, a 9 of diamonds, a 9 of clubs and a 9 of spades. The Four of a Kind will lose to a Straight Flush or higher, but it will win against a Full House or lower.
Full House
Full House
           If you want the poker ranking for a Full House, then combine a three of a kind and a pair together. For example, a Full House would be a 7 of hearts, a 7 of diamonds and a 7 of spades along with a 9 of spades and a 9 of hearts. A Full House will lose against a Straight Flush or higher but it will win against a Flush or lower.
Flush
Flush
           A Flush is next and this hand consists of 5 cards, all with the same suit, but in random order. For example, all diamonds… or all spades. A Flush will lose against a Full House or higher but will win against a Straight or lower.
Straight
Straight
           A Straight is when all of the cards are in sequence but they have different suits. For example, a 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. A Straight will lose against a Flush or higher but will win against a 3 of a Kind or lower. Here is another difference between Pai-Gow Poker and normal Poker. See, normally in Poker, the second highest straight is a King, Queen, Jack, ten and nine, but in Pai-Gow Poker, the second highest straight is an Ace, 2, 3, 4 and 5.
3 of a Kind
3 of a Kind
           Next on the list is a Three of a Kind, and this is when you have 3 cards of equal value. For example, if you had three Jacks, or three 7’s. A Three of a Kind will lose against a Straight or higher and will win against a Two Pair or lower.
Two Pair
Two Pair
Pair
Pair
           Two Pair is just how it sounds, you have two pairs. A Pair are two cards of the same value. For example, a pair of 5’s and if you added a pair of 8’s then you’d have two pair. Two Pair will lose against a Three of a Kind or higher and it will win against a pair or lower. A Pair will lose against Two Pair or higher and it will win against high card.
High Card
High Card
           High Card is any hand with no rank or value. So when referring to a High Card Hand, say the highest ranked card first, followed by the word “High”. For example, a Queen, 10, 9, 7, 5, 3, 2 all in a different suits would be a Queen-High Pai-Gow. Pai-Gow is just another way to describe a none ranking hand.
Commission
           Winning bets are charged a 5% commission which will be collected immediately by the dealer. Commission is paid This means that for every $5 the player wins they must pay a $0.25 commission. When calculating the math for commission, you have two options. The first option is to take 10% of the bet and divide it by 2. Commission Chart The second option is to memorize the basic chart and add the commissions as you go. So if you can remember that every $5 bet owes a $0.25 commission, every $20 bet owes a $1.00 commission and every $100 bet owes a $5 commission then you should be good to go.

           Did you notice on the chart that both $1 and $5 bet is charged the same commission of $0.25? The reason why is because commissions are paid to the nearest quarter. Another word for this is “Breakage” which means when the amount is either rounded up or down in the casino’s favor. Breakage has a secondary meaning and it is, a policy casinos use to increase profits, by using math against the unsuspecting player. An example of breakage is, if the player bets $18, you can’t really ask them for a $0.90 commission on the extra $3; this is when breakage applies. If the player has a bet between $1 - $4, then the dealer will round up to the nearest $5 and charge them a $0.25 commission. Commission is taken out of the players winning wager

           All players with winning bets are responsible for their own commissions. Normally, the dealer will just take the commission out of the player’s winning bet but if the player has the coinage then they may elect to pay the commission themselves instead.
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